5 Must Haves for Great Content

Everybody worth their salt in the industry today is churning out really good content. It has become tougher to make yourself stand out. Mediocre content has no takers. It is all about great content today.

Over the last 3 years I have engaged with online audiences through posts, blogs, articles, self created images, videos and the works. This blog post is a culmination of what worked for maximum engagement.

1. Keep it real: One of my posts on LinkedIn that did well was about how I overcame a speech defect. With home fashioned speech therapy and my parents never give up attitude, one can barely make out today that I have difficulty speaking. When I say keep it real, it means just that.

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Everything that you publish doesn’t have to have happened to you. But it has to have had an impact on you. Write about your experience with it and your thought process. When you engage on another’s content, talk about what you are truly feeling and not what you think you should be feeling. Caveat- when you think you have nothing to say about some thing, do exactly that, say nothing.

2. The rule of odds: This is probably the oldest trick in the book. I don’t know how it works, but it does. When your headline says “3/5/7/9/11 great ways to do great things” and such, there are a lot many readers than when your headline reads “Your way to do great things”. Title your piece such that it elicits curiosity-

  • what should you absolutely know about the future of AI in HR?
  • find out in 3 easy steps if your resume is what the world is looking for.
  • one fool proof method of elevating your craft

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 11.11.18 AMI write 3 headlines per post when I start writing it. By the time I am about to publish, I have figured out which one will work best for me.

3. Understand content marketing: The basic idea of content marketing is that over time, as people read you enough and follow you enough, they take action. I used to read this health magazine “Prevention”. I credit my running career to it. Every month there would be a detailed article on how to be a great runner, how to pace, how to breath, when to sip, when to stop, samples of running schedules and what nots. I eventually created my own routine but had that magazine not been there, I wouldn’t have been a runner! Every piece of content that you write has to have an eventual goal. This blog post on https://drywaters.blog/ has content that teaches you to write, to think while writing and on entrepreneurship. The ultimate call to action is that the reader refers to this blog when they take up writing. I see encouraging responses already in the form of comments and questions.

4. Editing and proofreading should be your 2nd most powerful tool: The first obviously being your original content. Eliminate fluff. It’s tough to cancel out lines that you have crafted painstakingly, but it will make your content read much much better. As an example- this was my first version of the 3rd point:

The basic idea of content marketing is that over time, as people read you enough and follow you enough, they get up and take action. I used to read this health magazine “Prevention”. It finally stopped distribution in India. But I can credit my running career to that magazine. Every month there would be a detailed article on how to be a great runner, how to pace, how to breath, when to sip, when to stop, samples of running schedules and what nots. While I eventually ended up creating my own routine and working out with an app, had that magazine not been there, I wouldn’t have been a runner! Every piece of content that you write has to have an eventual goal. This blog post on https://drywaters.blog/ has content that teaches you to write, to think while writing and on entrepreneurship. Occasionally I also write on mental health and community. The ultimate aim is that the reader refer to this blog when they take up writing. That’s my call to action. I see encouraging responses in the form of comments and questions.

What I finally published was:

The basic idea of content marketing is that over time, as people read you enough and follow you enough, they take action. I used to read this health magazine “Prevention”. I credit my running career to it. Every month there would be a detailed article on how to be a great runner, how to pace, how to breath, when to sip, when to stop, samples of running schedules and what nots. I eventually created my own routine but had that magazine not been there, I wouldn’t have been a runner! Every piece of content that you write has to have an eventual goal. This blog post on https://drywaters.blog/ has content that teaches you to write, to think while writing and on entrepreneurship. The ultimate call to action is that the reader refers to this blog when they take up writing. I see encouraging responses already in the form of comments and questions.

That’s a whole difference of 31 words, and I assure you I have done the same for each point that you see on this post. You can see another example of this on my blog post here.

5. Add images and videos mindfully: When you think your point will be better illustrated by an image or a video, please add it. Seek permission from the creator if it is not yours. Audiences can be both readers and viewers. While you can’t always cater to every reader’s natural inclination, adding that one image or video goes a long way in enriching your content. Also if an image can completely replace a piece of your text, I’d say go for it!

When it comes to content marketing, these are the two blogs that I swear by. They will give you deeper insights to most aspects.

https://www.garyvaynerchuk.com/blog/

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 11.13.12 AM

https://neilpatel.com/blog/

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Garima Rai says:

    Awesome. Thanks for these insights.

    Like

    1. Dry Waters says:

      My pleasure 🙂

      Like

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